Copernicus Science Center in Warsaw, Poland

Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland = Fun for the whole family

Have you ever seen a fire tornado, experienced a simulated earthquake, or turned on a light bulb with a stair master?

You can do all that and more at the Copernicus Science Centre (Centrum Nauki Kopernika) in Warsaw, Poland, which opened in 2010, right on the bank of the Vistula river.

We’ve been there twice – once right after it opened, and the second time in January 2013. Both times not only the kids had a lot of fun, but the grown ups as well.

What can you see at the Copernicus Science Centre?

Well, looking at the Centre website I see that several of the exhibits that my kids loved, have been replaced by new, probably just as exciting exhibits, but a few of the old classics remained:

“Roots of Civilization”

The “Roots of Civilization” area, located on the ground floor, explains how some inventions, some quite ancient, changed the world and contributed to the development of the civilization.

At one of the exhibits, you can see what your name would look like when spelled in Egyptian hieroglyphics.

my name, Jolanta, in hieroglyphics
my name, Jolanta, in hieroglyphics

At another, you can change various factors in a trigonometric function and see what kind of shape it creates. My son really loved that one each time we went there!

the formula in the trigonometry exhibit at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland
the formula in the trigonometry exhibit
photo of the trigonometry exhibit at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland from 2010
photo of the trigonometry exhibit at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland from 2010
photo of the trigonometry exhibit at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland from 2013
photo of the trigonometry exhibit at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland from 2013

You can also watch a fire tornado

fire tornado at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland
fire tornado at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland
“On The Move”

In the “On The Move” exhibit, located on the upper floor, you can play inside a giant hamster wheel:

inside a giant hamster wheel at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland
inside a giant hamster wheel

You can make electricity with a “stair master”:

making electricity with a "stair master" at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland
making electricity with a “stair master” at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland

You can experience an earthquake:

Earthquake simulator at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland
Earthquake simulator at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland

And you can learn about ferrofluids – liquids that have a consistency similar to mayonnaise, and which include tiny needles that can be magnetized. If you put a magnet near them, they move and form extraordinary shapes. Ferrofluids are used in shock absorbers, clutches, and brakes, among others.

ferrofluids at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland
ferrofluids at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland

The Copernicus Science Centre also has the typical science museum staples such as the plasma ball:

my kids can't simply walk by a plasma ball without touching it
my kids can’t simply walk by a plasma ball without touching it

and giant bubbles:

standing in a giant bubble at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland
standing in a giant bubble at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland
Past Exhibit: “Good Vibrations”

I am glad we got to see the “Good Vibrations” exhibit last time we visited.

The exhibit asked “Is it possible to see a sound? To touch it? To step on it?” and taught the visitors about sound and acoustics and its relationship to math and physics.

Both of my the kids really enjoyed banging on sticks for an extended period of time:

making music with sticks at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland
making music with sticks at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland

playing with the slam organ:

playing (with) the slam organ at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland
playing (with) the slam organ at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland

or making with various objects sounds that only they could hear through their headphones:

making music at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland
making music at the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland
What else is there?

Take a look at this YouTube video in English for a general overview of what you can see at the Copernicus Science Centre.

Because the exhibits change so often, I’m sure we’ll go to the Copernicus Science Centre next time we’re in Warsaw. I also want to finally make it to the Centre’s garden on the rooftop, and visit the Planetarium – two things which we haven’t seen yet.

And don’t worry if you don’t have kids. The Centre designers thought about you too! The Centre’s website has a section written specifically “For Adults,” highlighting events and exhibits of special interest to grown ups.

Ticket Prices

Unfortunately the online information about tickets is only in Polish, but here are the prices (updated November 19, 2015) if you don’t understand Polish:

Full price tickets are 27 złoty, which is about $7.00 US or €6.15.

If you’re a child, youth, a college student with a proper ID, or are over 65, your ticket will be 18 złoty (about $4).

A family ticket, which admits a family of four, will cost 77 złoty or about $20 US.

The price of the ticket includes a performance in the Robotic Theatre and entrance to the High Voltage Theatre.

The movies in the Planetarium are 23 złoty for a 3D show, and 18 złoty for a 2D (these are full price tickets).

Getting There

Public transportation is the easiest way to get to the Copernicus Science Centre – it is located within brief walking distance from the Centrum Nauki Kopernik subway (metro) station.

route from the metro (subway) station to the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland
route from the metro (subway) station to the Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland

Warsaw public transportation offers several different types of tickets: timed, single-fare, one day, weekend, and so on. At today’s exchange rates, you can go all over Warsaw on its extensive subway, tram, and bus network for a mere $4.11 (a single day ticket is only 15 zloty).

I hope you’ll get to see the Copernicus Science Centre some day! It is really fun!

In the meantime, follow them on Instagram, and like them on Facebook.

Visit the Copernicus Science Center in Warsaw, Poland to see a fire tornado, experience a simulated earthquake, or turn on a light bulb with a stair master.
Visit the Copernicus Science Center in Warsaw, Poland to see a fire tornado, experience a simulated earthquake, or turn on a light bulb with a stair master.

Where to Stay in Warsaw

Since my family lives in Warsaw, I always stay either at my parents’ or at my sister’s place, but there are plenty of hotels, hostels, and vacation rentals in Warsaw. It’s a capital after all!

Invitation to #WeekendWanderlust Link Up

#WeekendWanderlust, hosted by Chris & Heather from A Brit and a Southerner, Jessi & Tara from Outbound Adventurer, Ashley from A Southern Gypsy, Justin and Lauren from Justin Plus Lauren, and yours truly, is a collaborative effort to share travel blog posts, and to discuss all travel-related things.

The hosts organize each week a link up through which travel bloggers from around the world can promote their posts, in exchange for a promise to give some attention to other travel bloggers. (One of the rules for linking up is to comment on three linked up posts.)

If the link up is still open, feel free to add a link to one of your posts below, then comment on three linked up posts. And I welcome comments as well, of course!

#WeekendWanderlust link up logo
#WeekendWanderlust link up badge | to download, right click and “save as” then include it at the end of your post with a paragraph about the link up and links back to the hosts (feel free to use a modified version of the first two paragraphs above)

 


29 thoughts on “Copernicus Science Centre in Warsaw, Poland = Fun for the whole family”

    1. Thank you for reading, Fairlie! There’s a platform at the museum that lets you experience what it feels like during an earthquake, with a video of a room showing what it would look like at various strengths. It was quite interesting.

    1. You absolutely CAN go there without kids. I think they welcome adults as well, that’s why they have a separate “For Adults” page, showcasing events that focus on more advanced or in depth science.

    1. Thank you for reading, Michele! I do hope you’ll end up in Poland eventually. There’s plenty to see!

  1. This museum is exactly the type I like to visit with my family. It’s so might more enjoyable for all because it captures all age groups and we all learn something. Your name in Hieroglyphics looks beautiful.
    Brenda recently posted…Style InspirationsMy Profile

    1. Thank you for reading, Brenda! Yes, it’s a great place, and definitely worth visiting. I hope you’ll see it some day.

    1. Thank you for reading, Victoria! And yes, my son has always loved science, but I do too, so we always try to visit the local science museum wherever we are. My daughter, on the other hand, is into zoos and aquariums.

    1. Thank you for reading, Amy! Yes, you do need to go to Central East Europe and Poland some time! I think you’d be pleasantly surprised.

    1. Thank you for reading, Lesley! I do hope you’ll make it to Poland in 2016, and I hope I’ll make it to California next year too!

    1. Thank you for reading, The Adventure Ahead! Yes, the Copernicus Science Centre IS a fun place!

    1. Thank you for reading, Katja! I hope you and your family will get to see this place some day.

  2. I have to be honest, we went to Warsaw 15 years ago and I thought we would never go back. This place looks so cool, we might have to reconsider. My kids would love this science centre and the hands on exhibits look really exciting! Thanks for sharing!
    Kirsten recently posted…15 Great Books for Summer VacationMy Profile

  3. Looks like a fabulous museum. Never been to Poland, but have been to many science centers in the US and they have always been so much fun.

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