All posts by Jolanta

Invitation to Play “Scavenger Hunt” at the Harvard Art Museums – The Clues

You may have heard that Sunday, November 16, 2014 is the Opening Celebration at Harvard Art Museums, which is reopening after a long renovation that started with the closing of Harvard’s Fogg and Busch-Reisinger museums in June 2008, and the Sackler Museum in June 2013.

Now collections from all three museums are  housed under one roof in the completely renovated and expanded site of the former Fogg Museum designed by Renzo Piano, renowned architect who also designed the post-modern The Centre Pompidou in Paris and the expansion of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.

Even though the official opening is on Sunday, two days away, Harvard Art Museums had opened its doors to Harvard affiliates earlier today and of course I simply could not miss the chance to go see it. (I should point out that while I work at the university, I am NOT one the museum staff, and sadly, my job has nothing to do with writing about art or travel.)

Continue reading Invitation to Play “Scavenger Hunt” at the Harvard Art Museums – The Clues

Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, NH: A Review & a bit of history

I admit, if it weren’t for the M.C. Escher exhibit, I’d probably never think of going to the Currier Museum of Art, in Manchester, New Hampshire. And that would be too bad, because I’d miss out on a fun, inspiring, and educational afternoon.

As an article “Currier Gallery of Art: a small but distinctive collection,” published in The Christian Science Monitor in 1981 said:

[T]he Currier, considered to be one of the best small art museums in the US, is better known among curators and art historians in Paris and New York than it is in its own region. Both the Louvre and the Metropolitan have borrowed artwork from the compact gallery, which has as its motto, “One masterpiece is more to be desired than a roomful of run-of-the-mill paintings.”

Continue reading Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, NH: A Review & a bit of history

Flat Stanley’s visit to Garden in the Woods in Framingham, MA

One beautiful September Saturday, Flat Stanley, my daughter, and I went to a place called Garden in the Woods, a woodland botanic garden in Framingham, Massachusetts, 342 miles, or nearly six-hour-drive, from Stanley’s home in Charlestown, Maryland.

The garden is owned by the New England Wild Flower Society, which cultivates plants native to New England. The society  also offers instructional walks or hikes for children and families, as well as programs for adults  about horticulture and gardening, botany and conservation, and art in nature (photographing and drawing nature). Continue reading Flat Stanley’s visit to Garden in the Woods in Framingham, MA

Liebster Awards, or as I’ve been calling it #blogspotlight

liebster award
liebster award

A few days ago, BEATRAVELING posted “And the Liebster Award Goes to…ME 🙂,” in which she nominated me and a few other bloggers for the Liebster Award.

THANK YOU BEATRAVELING!

Mind you, BEATRAVELING’s web site is a bit deceptive, because when you first look at it, you might think there’s not much there. But just go to the drop down list of “Countries” in the right hand column, and you’ll see this girl has been all over the world!

I’ve never heard of the Liebster Award, but since it involves talking about myself, and about my favorite overlooked blogs… hey, why not? right?

The rules for the award are:

1) Thank the blogger who nominated you, with a link back to his/her blog
2) Answer the 11 questions your nominator asks you
3) Nominate 5–11 bloggers with under 500 Twitter followers
4) Create 11 questions for your nominees
5) Display the Liebster Award logo on your page
6) List these 6 rules in your blog post

Continue reading Liebster Awards, or as I’ve been calling it #blogspotlight

The Amazing Castelo dos Mouros (The Moorish Castle) in Sintra, Portugal

First word of advice – if you want to visit Castelo dos Mouros (The Moorish Castle) in Sintra, Portugal – get there BEFORE the parks open at 9am (10 am in the wintertime) if you can, because right at 9am the cars and busloads of tourists start pouring in, and soon every spot along the road winding toward the castle and down into the city will be taken.

Second piece of advice – if you also want to go to the Park and National Palace of Pena (Parque e Palacio Nacional de Pena)wear comfortable shoes with good, non-slip soles, because that will be a LOT of walking.

And last but not least – bring a jacket or a sweater, because even if it’s the middle of the summer and hot down below, it might be colder and windy up on the mountain. It was when we were there in July 2014.

Continue reading The Amazing Castelo dos Mouros (The Moorish Castle) in Sintra, Portugal

“You are not, not, not to look at your Baedeker” – Travel and Guidebooks

The post below was written for a “Social Media and Analytics” class, taught by Leila Samii (@reallyleila), that I took in the fall of 2014, but I hope you’ll enjoy it anyway.

If you’ve read E. M. Forster’s A Room with a View, you may remember how despondent Lucy Honeychurch was upon entering a church without her trusty Baedeker (a guidebook), because without it, she could not “tell […] which, of all the sepulchral slabs that paved the nave and transepts, was the one that was really beautiful.”

As Nicholas T. Parsons explains in Worth the Detour: A History of the Guidebook, Forster’s “irony is directed at [the guidebooks] misuse as a surrogate for thought and a dampener of spontaneity.”

Lucy loosened up quite a bit over the course of the story, but the question remains: Should we travel with a guidebook, real or virtual , or just wander around, letting our eyes and chance guide us?

Continue reading “You are not, not, not to look at your Baedeker” – Travel and Guidebooks